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Posts Tagged ‘Coos Bay’

While we’ve been gone from our home state much has happened here on the coast to cheer about.

Jordan Cove LNG Terminal Permit Denied

LNG pipelinesPerhaps the biggest and brightest win here on the coast was the denial by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) of the Canadian-based energy company Verisen’s application for a permit to construct a liquified natural gas (LNG) terminal on Coos Bay’s north spit.

Through 14(!) years of shenanigans that began with the coy proposal that Jordan Cove would be for import (which local activists doubted from the start) and ended with the old switch-a-roo to export, ultimately the Jordan Cove project sunk when the company couldn’t prove the need for it. (Currently there are no potential overseas buyers for the LNG.) Additionally the company had been unsuccessful in securing the rights-of-way for the pipeline linking Wyoming’s gas fields to the oceanside facility. Verisen would have had to rely on eminent domain to seize the necessary land route (long, costly and likely to create very hostile [ex]landowners).

Both sides were stunned by the decision which came without warning Friday March 10. While local activists cheered, Verisen pledged to re-submit. But for now the terminal, located in a tsunami zone and near a school, is dead in the water.

For more information see: http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2016/03/feds_deny_jordan_cove_lng_term.html

There are also previous posts on this blog. Search “Coos Bay LNG terminal”.

Bandon Biota Abandons Golf Course Plans for State Park Land

Bandon Property Boundaries courtesy of the Oregon Coastal Alliance

Bandon Property Boundaries
courtesy of the Oregon Coastal Alliance

In September 2015 Bandon Biota LLC, the developers who brought the south coast Bandon Dunes Golf Resort, abandoned plans to use a piece of undeveloped state parkland south of Bandon in a land/money/gorse clearing swap that included helping to purchase land in Eastern Oregon for a new park. Folks in Eastern Oregon weren’t too happy about that, nor, it ended up, was the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) who originally passed the Bandon coastal land to State Parks. BLM nixed the deal because the original documents of transmission stated that the land would remain permanently undeveloped park, no matter the apparent enticements offered. Many had argued from the beginning that agreeing to swap state park land would set an unfortunate precedent and were greatly disappointed by the State Parks Commissioners April, 2014 decision to give the project the green light. Since it turned out it was really BLM’s decision to make, they untimately stepped in and stopped the project.

You can see more about it here: http://www.oregoncoastalliance.org/victories/bandon-biota-exchange-a-controversial-project-ends/

There are a number of previous posts about this “deal” also on this website. Enter “Bandon biota” in search.

Next Up: Oregon phases out Coal and the hottest February ever.

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There is a magical garden tucked away within Mingus Park in Coos Bay.

Morning Song Bridge

Morning Song Bridge © SR Euston

We discovered it recently while having a picnic at the park. At the west end of the big pond we spotted a gracefully arched, bright red bridge. It turned out to be the entrance to a lovely Japanese-style garden named for Choshi, Japan, Coos Bay’s sister city.

Quiet Pond © SR Euston

Quiet Pond © SR Euston

Work on the garden began in 1985 by the  local architectural firm Crow/Clay, assisted by an army of volunteers, and in consultation with city officials from Choshi. It was dedicated in 1996 ceremony which Choshi representatives attended.

From Morning Song Bridge © SR Euston

From Morning Song Bridge © SR Euston

It is a 2.4 acre promenade-style garden, where a seemingly meandering path leads from one “scene” to the next, each meticulously composed with tranquil diagonal view lines across moving water and among carefully chosen plantings. It includes the standard Japanese garden elements: water which begins in a small pond and then cascades gently down a narrow stream (the “Creek of Whispering Waters”) and ultimately into the park’s main lake; carefully chosen and placed rocks; artful bridges and benches; a 3000 pound granite lantern (“Snow Lantern”) on a tiny island in the “Pond of Illusion”; fish; and plantings including flowering cherry trees, Japanese maples, dogwood, azaleas, rhododendrons and bamboo. Taken together they form a lovely, seemingly natural but perfectly conceived garden which welcomes leisurely strolls and quiet contemplation.

Contemplation © SR Euston

Autumn Scene © SR Euston

Time seems to slow down for everyone who enters Choshi Garden. Nothing rushes; no one skate boards; people talk in lowered voices. It is immensely calming.

The red bridge, “The Morning Song”, was rebuilt in 2007 and shored up in 2009. It is painted red like the Japanese garden bridges which it copies.

Choshi is maintained by volunteers who keep its trees and shrubs artfully manicured and is a part of the Coos Bay City Park system. When you go, perhaps you’ll even be greeted by this graceful bird—a perfect symbol of  a magical  Japanese jewel in this lumber city by the sea.

Heron © SR Euston

Snowy Egret © SR Euston

Choshi Gardens is open every day. Off US 101, take Commercial Street west to 10th Street. Turn north. Mingus Park is one block away on the west side of 10th. Choshi Garden is on the west side of the park.

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